Day 23, 735: Teamwork Exercises at Work.

 The pictures were posted today from yesterday’s event at the EsCape May escape room place.  Of course the pictures were a nice souvenir, but when you’re picture is being taken it’s a time to be very self-conscious. How do I look? How should I stand? Can I please take a picture I won’t hate tomorrow!

As they took the picture, I forgot to take my glasses off, but I kept remembering to stick my neck out. It’s advice that becomes more not less important the older you get. It’s especially important for someone like me who also has to remember to keep my eyes open and not blink during picture taking sessions. I have ruined more family photos than the average bear.

Related Post: Teamwork at Work

The glasses actually help me not to blink and I’d be wise to take more pictures with my glasses on than off. But because I usually concentrate so hard on keeping my eyes open, I pull my head back and that gives you an instant turkey neck, whether you have one or not.

A few years ago, we stumbled across an article from a professional photographer who gave words of advice on how to take a good picture especially for older women.  His key piece of advice was to lean into the picture, or in very succinct terms – stick you chin out.

It works. It does. I did it yesterday and the picture isn’t half bad.

Sticking your neck out is great advice for more than picture taking. As you get older, you tend to get more risk averse. You tend to lean back instead of leaning forward. That’s a bad sign of aging. A good sign of aging is to continue to take the stairs, go out on a cold day, and stick your neck out in life much less in pictures.

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Daily Focus on Gun Sanity.  It’s easy to stay silent about hot button issues – gun control being one of the big ones. But speaking up, the action that takes nerve, helps to get issues on the ballot and encourage others to find their courage to speak out.  It’s an action of sticking your neck out. Try it with one Facebook post, one blog post, or one comment in a casual conversation. It gets easier over time and with practice.